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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

CHAPTER 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens

Smetana, Glinka, and Balakirev

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

If the New German School did not lack opponents at home, neither did its influence stop at the border. One of its most enthusiastic disciples was Bedřich Smetana (1824–84), who is now chiefly remembered (to quote the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians) as “the first major nationalist composer of Bohemia” (or, in today's vocabulary, the Czech lands). How could a Czech nationalist also be a “New German”? There are some paradoxes to sort out.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 2 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-009.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-009.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Slavs as Subjects and Citizens." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-009.xml
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