We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

CHAPTER 4 Nations, States, and Peoples

Romantic Opera in Germany (Mozart, Weber), France (Auber, Meyerbeer), and Russia (Glinka)

Chapter:
CHAPTER 4 Nations, States, and Peoples
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

Up to now we have seen peasants on the operatic stage only as accessories. They represented their class, not their country. The elevation of Volkstümlichkeit to the status of a romantic ideal changed all that. It happened first, of course, in Germany, the land where das Volk was first “discovered.” And the first operas in which the new concept of das Volk showed up were the nineteenth-century descendants of the vernacular comic operas known as singspiels, “plays with singing.”

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 Nations, States, and Peoples." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 16 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 4 Nations, States, and Peoples. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 16 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 4 Nations, States, and Peoples." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 16 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-004.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.