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Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

CHAPTER 3 Volkstümlichkeit

The Romantic Lied; Mendelssohn's Career; the Two Nationalisms

Chapter:
CHAPTER 3 Volkstümlichkeit
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

Although German-speaking composers have been prominent in the last several chapters (and will remain so for several chapters to come), and despite the frequent claim that their prominence raised the German “art music” tradition in the nineteenth century to the status of general standard and model (at least within the instrumental domain), the fact is that only two important musical genres were actually German in origin, and one of them was vocal.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 2 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 3 Volkstümlichkeit." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-003.xml
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