We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music in the Nineteenth Century

CHAPTER 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones

Beethoven Vs. Rossini; Bel Canto Romanticism

Chapter:
CHAPTER 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones
Source:
MUSIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

In only one area did Beethoven fail to exert a transforming influence on the music of his time, and that was opera. Fidelio, his single operatic venture, initially a flop, was revised so often and so extensively that three distinct versions and no fewer than four overtures for it survive. As if recognizing that his talent suffered a limitation where the theater was concerned, Beethoven concentrated thereafter on composing “incidental music” for dramatic plays.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 2 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-001.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones. In Oxford University Press, Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-001.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 1 Real Worlds, and Better Ones." In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 2 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume3/actrade-9780195384833-chapter-001.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.