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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

Contents

Chapter:
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES

  1. Chapter 1 Opera from Monteverdi to Monteverdi 1

  2. Princely and Public Theaters; Monteverdi’s Contributions to Both

    • Court and commerce • From Mantua to Venice • Poetics and esthesics • Opera and its politics • Sex objects, sexed and unsexed • The quintessential princely spectacle • The carnival show
  3. Chapter 2 Fat Times and Lean 35

  4. Organ Music from Frescobaldi to Scheidt; Schütz’s Career; Oratorio and Cantata

    • Some organists • The toccata • Sweelinck—His patrimony and his progeny • Lutheran adaptations: The chorale partita • The chorale concerto • Ruin • A creative microcosm • Luxuriance • Shriveled down to the expressive nub • Carissimi: Oratorio and cantata • Women in music: A historians’ dilemma
  5. Chapter 3 Courts Resplendent, Overthrown, Restored 85

  6. Tragédie Lyrique from Lully to Rameau; English Music in the Seventeenth Century

    • Sense and sensuousness • The politics of patronage • Drama as court ritual • Atys, the king’s opera • Art and politics: Some caveats • Jacobean England • Masque and consort • Ayres and suites: Harmonically determined form • Distracted times • Restoration • Purcell • Dido and Aeneas and the question of “English opera” • The making of a classic
  7. Chapter 4 Class and Classicism 139

  8. Opera Seria and Its Makers

    • Naples • Scarlatti • Neoclassicism • Metastasio • Metastasio’s musicians • The fortunes of Artaserse • Opera seria in (and as) practice • “Performance practice”
  9. Chapter 5 The Italian Concerto Style and the Rise of Tonality-Driven Form 177

  10. Corelli, Vivaldi, and Their German Imitators

    • Standardized genres and tonal practices • What, exactly, is “tonality”? • The spread of “tonal form” • The fugal style • Handel and “defamiliarization” • Bach and “dramatized” tonality • Vivaldi’s five hundred • “Concerti madrigaleschi”
  11. Chapter 6 Class of 1685 (I) 233

  12. Careers of J. S. Bach and G. F. Handel Compared; Bach’s Instrumental Music

    • Contexts and canons • Careers and lifestyles • Roots (domestic) • Roots (imported) • Bach’s suites • A close-up • “Agrémens” and “doubles” • Stylistic hybrids • The “Brandenburg” Concertos • “Obbligato” writing and/or arranging • What does it all mean?
  13. Chapter 7 Class of 1685 (II) 305

  14. Handel’s Operas and Oratorios; Bach’s Cantatas and Passions; Domenico Scarlatti

    • Handel on the Strand • Lofty entertainments • Messiah • “Borrowing” • Back to Bach: The cantatas • The old style • The new style • Musical symbolism, musical idealism • What music is for • Bach’s “testaments” • The Bach revival • Cursed questions • Scarlatti, at last
  15. Chapter 8 The Comic Style 399

  16. Mid-Eighteenth-Century Stylistic Change Traced to Its Sources in the 1720s; Empfindsamkeit; Galanterie; “War of the Buffoons”

    • You can’t get there from here • The younger Bachs • Sensibility • The London Bach • Sociability music • “Nature” • Intermission plays • The “War of the Buffoons”
  17. Chapter 9 Enlightenment and Reform 445

  18. The Operas of Piccinni, Gluck, and Mozart

    • Novels sung on stage • Noble simplicity • Another querelle • What was Enlightenment? • Mozart • IdomeneoDie Entführung aus dem Serail • The “Da Ponte” operas • Late works • Don Giovanni close up • Music as a social mirror • Music and (or as) morality
  19. Chapter 10 Instrumental Music Lifts Off 497

  20. The Eighteenth-Century Symphony; Haydn

    • Party music goes public • Concert life is born • An army of generals • The Bach sons as “symphonists” • Haydn • The perfect career • The Esterházy years • Norms and deviations: Creating musical meaning • Sign systems • Anatomy of a joke • The London tours • Addressing throngs • Variation and development • More surprises • The culminating work
  21. Chapter 11 The Composer’s Voice 589

  22. Mozart’s Piano Concertos; His Last Symphonies; the Fantasia as Style and as Metaphor

    • Art for art’s sake? • Psychoanalyzing music • The “symphonic” concerto is born • Mozart in the marketplace • Composing and performing • Performance as self-dramatization • The tip of the iceberg • Fantasia as metaphor • The coming of museum culture
  23. Chapter 12 The First Romantics 641

  24. Late Eighteenth-century Music Esthetics; Beethoven’s Career and His Posthumous Legend

    • The beautiful and the sublime • Classic or Romantic? • Beethoven and “Beethoven” • Kampf und Sieg • The Eroica • Crisis and reaction • The “Ninth” • Inwardness
  25. Chapter 13 C-Minor Moods 691

  26. The “Struggle and Victory” Narrative and Its Relationship to Four C-Minor Works of Beethoven

    • Devotion and derision • Transgression • Morti di Eroi • Germination and growth • Letting go • The music century

Citation (MLA):
"." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-miscMatter-006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
(n.d.). . In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-miscMatter-006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
"." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-miscMatter-006.xml