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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

THE OLD STYLE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Class of 1685 (II)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

For its chorale-concerto counterpart, Cantata BWV 4, one of Bach’s earliest surviving cantatas but also one of the best known, would make an appropriate choice. First performed at Muhlhausen—possibly on Easter Sunday (24 April) 1707 as part of Bach’s application for the organist’s post there—it consists of a set of variations on another venerable chorale, Christ lag in Todesbanden (“Christ lay enchained by death”), which Luther had adapted from the Gregorian Easter sequence Victimae paschali laudes.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Class of 1685 (II)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-07006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Class of 1685 (II). In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-07006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Class of 1685 (II)." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 13 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-07006.xml
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