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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

STYLISTIC HYBRIDS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 6 Class of 1685 (I)
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

By the time he reached creative maturity, Bach had thus assimilated and encompassed all the national idioms of his day. Indeed, like all Germans he made a specialty of commingling them; but his amalgamations were singular, even eccentric. They disclosed what even today can seem an unrivaled creative imagination, but one that was uniquely complicated, inexhaustibly crafty, even (while always technically assured and unfailingly alluring) at times incomprehensible and disturbing.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Class of 1685 (I)." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-06008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 6 Class of 1685 (I). In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-06008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Class of 1685 (I)." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 10 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-div1-06008.xml
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