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Contents

Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries

CHAPTER 2 Fat Times and Lean

Organ Music from Frescobaldi to Scheidt; Schütz’s Career; Oratorio and Cantata

Chapter:
CHAPTER 2 Fat Times and Lean
Source:
MUSIC IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

Whoever wrote it, and however it may have related to Monteverdi’s original design, the ending of L’incoronazione di Poppea was a harbinger. The seventeenth century was the great age of the ground bass. Infinitely extensible formal plans (if “plan” is indeed the word for something that is infinitely extensible) enabled musical compositions to achieve an amplitude comparable to the extravagantly majestic Counter Reformation church architecture that provided the spaces in which they were heard (and to which the word “baroque” was first applied).

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Fat Times and Lean." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-chapter-02.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 2 Fat Times and Lean. In Oxford University Press, Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries. New York, USA. Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-chapter-02.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 2 Fat Times and Lean." In Music In The Seventeenth And Eighteenth Centuries, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 15 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume2/actrade-9780195384826-chapter-02.xml
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