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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

ORATORIO

Chapter:
CHAPTER 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Just a brief word now, in closing, about the genre represented by Cavalieri’s Rappresentatione di Anima, et di Corpo, the sacred play that happened to scoop all the other early figured-bass publications into print. This work, too, has been claimed for consideration as “the first surviving opera” (to quote the New Grove Dictionary of Opera). It was produced in Rome in February 1600, about eight months before Peri’s Euridice saw the stage. It was set to continuous music, though without much recitative, and fully staged.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 24 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 24 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019008.xml
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