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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

THE REPRESENTATIONAL STYLE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The question is, are there any homologies at all between music and nature? There is one, Galilei contended, if by nature we mean human nature: and that is speech, or what linguists still call “natural language.” Plato himself had accounted for the “ethos” of the modes—their ability to influence the soul—on the basis of this homology. In the Republic, Socrates asks that just two modes be allowed for music in his ideal state: the one “that would fittingly imitate the utterances and the accents of a brave man who is engaged in warfare or in any enforced business, and who, when he has failed, either meeting wounds or death or having fallen into some other mishap, in all these conditions confronts fortune with steadfast endurance and repels her strokes”; and the one that imitates the speech of “a man engaged in works of peace, not enforced but voluntary, either trying to persuade somebody of something and imploring him—whether it be a god, through prayer, or a man, by teaching and admonition—or contrariwise yielding himself to another who is petitioning him or teaching him or trying to change his opinions, and in consequence faring according to his wish, and not bearing himself arrogantly, but in all this acting modestly and moderately and acquiescing in the outcome.”3 Glaucon, his interlocutor, informs Socrates that he has described the Dorian and the Phrygian modes, respectively.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 11 Dec. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 19 Pressure of Radical Humanism." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 11 Dec. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-019003.xml
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