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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

MUSIC AS DESCRIPTION

Chapter:
CHAPTER 17 Commercial and Literary Music
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

A new sort of “literary music”—or rather a possibly unwitting revival of an old sort—came into being when Attaingnant, still in his first year of publishing activity, brought out a slim volume devoted to the works of a single composer. The title page read Chansons de maistre Clement Janequin, and it contained only five items. Those five, however, took up as much space as fifteen had occupied in Attaingnant’s first collection. Four of them became famous and vastly influential all over Europe, and (most amazingly of all) remained in print for almost a century.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 19 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 19 Dec. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017005.xml
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