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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

GERMANY: THE TENORLIED

Chapter:
CHAPTER 17 Commercial and Literary Music
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The German counterpart to the frottola, as purveyed in the printed songbooks that appeared in Germany from 1507 (making that country chronologically the second to take up the music trade), is now known as the Tenorlied. That is the modern scholarly term for what contemporary musicians called a Kernweise (roughly, “core tune”): a polyphonic setting of a Liedweise, a familiar song-melody, placed usually in the tenor—or else a song that resembled a Liedweise setting in texture. In other words, it was a cantus-firmus setting of a lyrical melody, either traditional or newly composed, in what by the early sixteenth century would have been considered in other countries a fairly dated style.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 22 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017003.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 22 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017003.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 17 Commercial and Literary Music." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 22 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-017003.xml
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