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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

SPATIALIZED FORM

Chapter:
CHAPTER 15 A Perfected Art
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Julio Segni has been identified as someone who held the position of “first organist” under Willaert and Buus as one who, somewhat later, served under him as “second organist.” The terms were not solely indications of rank. Since the late fifteenth century, St. Mark’s Cathedral actually had two organ lofts, each with its designated player. It was inevitable that antiphonal music-making would be cultivated there, with the cathedral cappella split into two groups, one standing in a hexagonal enclosure called the pergolo (when it wasn’t occupied by the Doge and his retinue), the other across the nave in the Gospel pulpit.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 15 A Perfected Art." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-015010.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 15 A Perfected Art. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-015010.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 15 A Perfected Art." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 Nov. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-015010.xml
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