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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

FACTS AND MYTHS

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 Josquin and the Humanists
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Févin was “Josquin’s happy follower” chiefly in matters of texture—the texture exemplified in Ave Maria, with its rhetorically supple alternation of pervading imitation and emphatic chordal declamation. The full integration of musical space—rather than the hierarchical stratification of parts found in older music, with each part carrying out its own particular functional assignment—implied not only a new technique but a whole new philosophy of composition.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 20 Nov. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 20 Nov. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 20 Nov. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014008.xml
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