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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

PARODIES

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 Josquin and the Humanists
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

And for that he was supremely valued by the humanist musicians of the sixteenth century, who were inspired by Josquin’s example and propagated it zealously. Glareanus reproduced the whole motet in his treatise, ostensibly as an illustration of the Ionian mode with its final on C, but in fact as an example to his readers of “genius” at work. Its impact on Glareanus’s contemporaries was profound. Where Glareanus verbally proclaimed the work an emblem of perfected style, his friend and colleague the Swiss composer Ludwig Sennfl proclaimed it so by musical deed.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 23 Apr. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014007.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 23 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014007.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 23 Apr. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014007.xml
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