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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

RECYCLING THE LEGEND BACK INTO MUSIC

Chapter:
CHAPTER 14 Josquin and the Humanists
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The greatest popularizer of the Josquin legend, however, was someone who was also concerned to popularize (or repopularize) Josquin’s music. This was Glareanus, the author of a great treatise that circulated piecemeal in manuscript for decades and was finally published in 1547 under the title Dodekachordon. Glareanus was a different sort of theorist from most of those whom we have encountered. He was neither a composer nor a practical musician but rather an all-round scholar of the purest humanistic type, a disciple of Desiderius Erasmus and a professor at the University of Freiburg im Briesgau in what is now the southwest corner of Germany, where he held chairs not in music but in poetry and theology. As a music theorist he consciously modeled himself on Boethius, the classical prototype of the encyclopedic humanist. But his actual musical views differed radically from everything Boethius had stood for.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 31 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 14 Josquin and the Humanists." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 31 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-014004.xml
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