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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

THE MILANESE GO LOWER STILL

Chapter:
CHAPTER 13 Middle and Low
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

A further step in the continental transformation—and stylistic “lowering”—of motet style was taken in Milan in the 1470s, when a custom was instituted within the Ambrosian rite of actually substituting votive motets addressed to Mary, more rarely to Christ or to local saints, for all of the Ordinary texts of the Mass (and in larger cycles, some of the Propers as well). Cycles of these motetti missales, or substitute motets for the Mass, were turned out in quantity. They are affectionately known by scholars as “loco Masses,” from the word meaning “in place of,” found in the rubrics that identify such pieces.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 13 Middle and Low." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-013004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 13 Middle and Low. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-013004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 13 Middle and Low." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-013004.xml
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