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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

OLD AND YOUNG ALIKE PAY TRIBUTE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 12 Emblems and Dynasties
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

To return, in conclusion, to strictly historical and “dynastic” matters, it is absorbing to ponder the intricate relationships of homage that obtained among composers of cyclic Masses. Among the L’Homme Armé Masses that reproduce the moment from Busnoys’s Sanctus depicted in Ex. 12-15a is one by Du Fay, the oldest and most distinguished composer to have joined the game. The corresponding passage in his Mass occurs near the end of the Credo (Ex. 12-16), and it is especially close to Busnoys’s allowing for the speedy diminished note-values that one usually finds near the climaxes of large cyclic Mass sections.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 22 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012013.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012013.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012013.xml
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