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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

AN ESTHETIC PARADOX (OR, THE PARADOX OF “ESTHETICS”)

Chapter:
CHAPTER 12 Emblems and Dynasties
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

And this raises a final cluster of fascinating, somewhat troubling questions. What is the relationship between the esthetics of modern music-listening and the esthetics of fifteenth- or sixteenth-century service music that is so often transplanted now from its natural habitat to the secular concert stage or to the even more casual venues where recordings are savored? What survives the translation process? What is lost in it? What, for that matter, may be gained?

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 27 Aug. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012012.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 27 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012012.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 12 Emblems and Dynasties." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 27 Aug. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-012012.xml
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