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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

CANON

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 Machaut and His Progeny
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Another word for a rubric like the “text” in this eccentric “rondeau”—especially one that, as here, enables the reader to deduce a concealed (because unnotated) voice-part—is canon. It is a Latinized Greek word that originally meant a stiff straight rod, and by extension came to mean, in the first place, a measuring rod, then anything that sets a standard or imposes a rule.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 30 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009016.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 30 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009016.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 30 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009016.xml
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