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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

CANTILENA

Chapter:
CHAPTER 9 Machaut and His Progeny
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

The new style of song-melody, composed with polyphonic accompaniment in mind, was called cantilena. By itself the melody was sufficient, making correct (subsemitonium) cadences and fitting the words. With the addition of a tenor, a self-sufficient two-part discant texture was achieved, in which cadences (to octaves or, more rarely, to unisons in contrary motion) were still correct according to the rules of discant. With the addition of a third voice, whether a texted triplum in the range of the cantus or an untexted contratenor in the range of the tenor, the two-part structure was sonorously enhanced and the harmonies made “sweet.”

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2017. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 11 Dec. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 9 Machaut and His Progeny." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 11 Dec. 2017, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-009004.xml
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