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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

A FINAL WORD FROM DANTE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

That was the net effect, and the net aim, of the discordia concors that the motet so consummately symbolized. The ultimate verbal expression of the effect at which musicians aimed in the fourteenth century and its immediate aftermath was given by the greatest literary genius of the age, the poet Dante Alighieri, in his Divine Comedy. Significantly enough, it is in the third and last section—Il Paradiso, a description of heaven—that the motet is heard and described. The great poet’s view of the peak musical genre of his day here coincides with that of the courtier Manetti, quoted above. Dante, who wrote around the time of Philippe de Vitry and the Roman de Fauvel, used a description of the motet as a metaphor for a world government of perfect justice, wholly attuned to the divine will, that perfectly harmonized multifarious humanity in bonds of social concord.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 25 Jul. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008016.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 25 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008016.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 25 Jul. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008016.xml
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