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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

BACKLASH

Chapter:
CHAPTER 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Just as the technology-minded theorists of the “Ars Nova” represented the first self-conscious avant garde faction in European literate music, so they inspired the first conservative backlash. It is found in the seventh and last book of the mammoth Speculum musicae (“The mirror of music”), at 521 chapters the largest of all medieval music treatises, completed around 1330 by Jacobus (or Jacques) de Liège. The author was a retired University of Paris professor (thus Jehan des Murs’s senior colleague) who had returned to his birthplace in Belgium to work on this grandiose project, which he intended as a summa summarum—a universal compendium—of musical knowledge. The young innovators of the “Ars Nova,” by extending the boundaries of musical theory, threatened the completeness of Jacobus’s account, so he tried to discredit their advance and thus neutralize the threat.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 16 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008005.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 16 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008005.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 16 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008005.xml
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