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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

REPRESENTING IT

Chapter:
CHAPTER 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Like all previous notational reforms, the Ars Nova retained the familiar shapes of Gregorian “square” notation, modifying them where necessary (as in supplying the minim) but as slightly as possible. What mainly changed were the rules by which the signs were interpreted. The same notated maxima could contain 16 minims or 81 minims or any of several quantities in between. How was one to know which?

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 21 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008004.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 21 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008004.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 8 Business Math, Politics, and Paradise: The Ars Nova." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 21 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-008004.xml
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