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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

THE ART OF MéLANGE

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Another motet with semibreves (in all parts this time, even the tenor) is given in Fig. 7-7 (facsimile) and Ex. 7-7 (transcription). Here the element of virtuoso composing (“fitting together”) is most apparent in the motetus part, which is none other than Robins m’aime, the opening virelai from Adam de la Halle’s Jeu de Robin et Marion (Ex. 4-9). The little tenor melisma, “Portare,” clipped originally from an Alleluia verse, was used for many motets, but never, it seems, for a clausula. It goes through a triple cursus here.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 22 Dec. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007008.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007008.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 22 Dec. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007008.xml
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