We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more

Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

TENOR “FAMILIES”

Chapter:
CHAPTER 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Of the three components that went into this brainy little song, the most frequently used was the tenor. The “In seculum” melisma, like several others (including “DO-”[mino] from the same parent gradual, Haec dies), was a great favorite with the university crowd, used over and over again as a motet tenor. This, too, was an aspect of “tour de force culture,” in which emulation or outdoing—doing the same thing but doing it better—was a cardinal aim.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 26 May. 2018. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 26 May. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 7 Music for an Intellectual and Political Elite." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 26 May. 2018, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-div1-007006.xml
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.