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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

CHAPTER 10 “A Pleasant Place”: Music of the Trecento

Italian Music of the Fourteenth Century

Chapter:
CHAPTER 10 “A Pleasant Place”: Music of the Trecento
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

As we know, the rise of European vernacular literatures began in Aquitaine, toward the end of the eleventh century, with the troubadours. By the end of the twelfth century, there was a significant body of vernacular poetry in French. By the end of the thirteenth century, the current had reached Germany. In all cases, the rise of a vernacular literature was accompanied by the development of song genres as the medium for its performance and dissemination.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 “A Pleasant Place”: Music of the Trecento." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-010.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 10 “A Pleasant Place”: Music of the Trecento. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 25 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-010.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 10 “A Pleasant Place”: Music of the Trecento." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 25 Oct. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-010.xml
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