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Contents

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

CHAPTER 6 Notre Dame de Paris

Parisian Cathedral Music in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries and its Makers

Chapter:
CHAPTER 6 Notre Dame de Paris
Source:
MUSIC FROM THE EARLIEST NOTATIONS TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Author(s):
Richard Taruskin

Richard Taruskin

Many circumstances conspired to make Paris the undisputed intellectual capital of Europe by the end of the twelfth century. The process of urbanization, traced to some degree in chapter 4, brought about a decline in the importance of monasteries as centers of learning and a swift rise in the prestige of cathedral schools. These schools were learning centers attached to cathedral churches, the large urban churches that were the seats (cathedrae) of bishops and that served as administrative centers for a surrounding ecclesiastical territory called a diocese.

Citation (MLA):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Notre Dame de Paris." The Oxford History of Western Music. Oxford University Press. New York, USA. n.d. Web. 1 Sep. 2014. <http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-006.xml>.
Citation (APA):
Taruskin, R. (n.d.). Chapter 6 Notre Dame de Paris. In Oxford University Press, Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century. New York, USA. Retrieved 1 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-006.xml
Citation (Chicago):
Richard Taruskin. "Chapter 6 Notre Dame de Paris." In Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century, Oxford University Press. (New York, USA, n.d.). Retrieved 1 Sep. 2014, from http://www.oxfordwesternmusic.com/view/Volume1/actrade-9780195384819-chapter-006.xml
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